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SRDR+:
Moving systematic reviews forward.
SRDR+ is a free, powerful, easy to use tool for data extraction, management, and archival during systematic reviews.
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Researchers

Use SRDR+ as a free platform for extracting, archiving, and sharing data during systematic reviews and accessing shared data related to systematic reviews.

Guideline Developers

Use SRDR+ for accessing data related to systematic reviews when producing guidelines and recommendation statements for their constituencies.

Educators & Librarians

Use SRDR+ for instructing students and trainees in the best practices related to research methodology and evaluation.

Clinicians

Use SRDR+ for quick reference to study data that are relevant to clinical questions based on systematic reviews.

Policymakers

Use SRDR+ for quick reference to study data that are relevant to policy questions or recommendations based on systematic reviews.

Leading professionals love SRDR+

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Mathias Perleth, MPH

Board Treasurer, International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment [INAHTA], Germany
“In my regard, SRDR is among the most relevant developments in recent years!”
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Christine Clifford, MHP

Project Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, USA
“I like SRDR’s use of the Tabs and the separation by topic area of the Tabs; it allows for focus on sections of a paper at a time. SRDR is powerful and adaptable, provides a way to standardize diverse results, and provides structure.“
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Tianjing Li, MD, MHS, PhD

Director, Cochrane Eyes and Vision United States Satellite, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, USA
“SRDR is one of the few data systems designed specifically for producing and archiving systematic reviews with the intention to share the data with the public. It’s extremely flexible and it allows users to design their forms (and data items on the forms) in a way that best suit their needs and workflow.”
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James Scott Parrott, PhD

Professor, Rutgers University School of Health Professions, USA
“The structure of SRDR lends itself well to teaching metacognitive processes associated with linking the discrete steps of the evidence analysis process. Another benefit is the flexibility of SRDR to handle diagnostic accuracy as well as etiology, treatment, and prognosis questions during systematic reviews.”

Create your systematic review project today

SRDR+ has a variety of features that make it the best place to conduct systematic reviews.
Build electronic data extraction forms
Extract and compare data
Collaborate with your team
Customize exports of your datasets

Access study data from published systematic reviews today.

Browse topics with available study data.
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Use study data in your own systematic review.

Recently published projects

First published on March 08, 2021
Last edited on April 21, 2021
Screening for Bacterial Vaginosis in Pregnant Adolescents and Women to Prevent Preterm Delivery
45 Studies • 5 Key Questions • 1 Extraction Forms
Objectives: A review of the evidence about screening for bacterial vaginosis during pregnancy to prevent preterm delivery.
First published on February 12, 2019
Last edited on April 14, 2021
SRDR Project Indexing
186 Studies • 1 Key Questions • 1 Extraction Forms
Objectives: This is a Methods Research project that catalogs the various projects with publicly available data on the SRDR Webpage.
First published on October 21, 2015
Last edited on April 30, 2021
Noninvasive Treatments for Low Back Pain [Entered Retrospectively]
156 Studies • 2 Key Questions • 1 Extraction Forms
Objectives: Objectives. Low back pain is common and many pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies are available. This review examines the evidence on the comparative benefits and harms of noninvasive treatments for low back pain. Data Sources. A prior systematic review (searches through October 2008), electronic databases (Ovid MEDLINE and the Cochrane Libraries, January 2008 to April 2015), reference lists, and clinical trials registries. Review Methods. Using predefined criteria, we selected systematic reviews of randomized trials of pharmacological treatments (acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAID]s, opioids, skeletal muscle relaxants, benzodiazepines, antidepressants, antiseizure medications, and systemic corticosteroids) and nonpharmacological treatments (psychological therapies, multidisciplinary rehabilitation, spinal manipulation, acupuncture, massage, exercise and related therapies, and various physical modalities) for nonradicular or radicular low back pain that addressed effectiveness or harms versus placebo, no treatment, usual care, a sham therapy, an inactive therapy, or another active therapy. We also included randomized trials that were not in systematic reviews. The quality of included studies was assessed, data were extracted, and results were summarized qualitatively based on the totality of the evidence. Results. Of the 2,545 citations identified at the title and abstract level, a total of 156 publications were included. Most trials enrolled patients with pain symptoms of at least moderate intensity (e.g., >5 on a 0- to 10-point NRS for pain). Across interventions, pain intensity was the most commonly reported outcome, followed by back-specific function. When present, observed benefits for pain were generally in the small (5 to 10 points on a 0- to 100-point visual analogue scale [VAS] or 0.5 to 1.0 points on a 0- to 10-point numerical rating scale) to moderate (10 to 20 points) range. Effects on function were generally smaller than effects on pain; in some cases there were positive effects on pain but no effects on function, and fewer studies measured function than pain. Benefits were mostly measured at short-term followup. For acute low back pain, evidence suggested that NSAIDs (strength of evidence [SOE]: low to moderate), skeletal muscle relaxants (SOE: moderate), opioids (SOE: low), exercise (SOE: low), and superficial heat (SOE: moderate) are more effective than placebo, no intervention, or usual care and that acetaminophen (SOE: low) and systemic corticosteroids (SOE: low) are no more effective than placebo. For chronic low back pain, effective therapies versus placebo, sham, no treatment, usual care, or wait list are NSAIDs, opioids, tramadol, duloxetine, multidisciplinary rehabilitation, acupuncture, and exercise (SOE: moderate) and benzodiazepines, psychological therapies, massage, yoga, tai chi, and low-level laser therapy (SOE: low); spinal manipulation was as effective as other active interventions (SOE: moderate). Few trials evaluated the effectiveness of treatments for radicular low back pain, but the available evidence found that benzodiazepines, corticosteroids, traction, and spinal manipulation were not effective or associated with small effects (SOE: low). Relatively few trials directly compared the effectiveness of different medications, different nonpharmacological therapies, or compared pharmacological versus nonpharmacological therapies, and generally found no clear differences in effects. Pharmacological therapies were associated with increased risk of adverse events versus placebo (SOE: low to moderate). Trials were not designed or powered to detect serious harms from pharmacological therapies. Although rates appeared to be low, and there was not an increased risk of serious harms versus placebo, this does not rule out significant risk from some treatments. For nonpharmacological therapies, assessment of harms was suboptimal, but serious harms appeared rare (SOE: low). Conclusions. A number of pharmacological and nonpharmacological, noninvasive treatments for low back pain are associated with small to moderate, primarily short-term effects on pain versus placebo, sham, wait list, or no treatment. Effects on function were generally smaller than effects on pain. More research is needed to understand optimal selection of treatments, effective combinations and sequencing of treatments, effectiveness of treatments for radicular low back pain, and effectiveness on outcomes other than pain and function.

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