Low-calorie sweeteners and body weight and composition: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials and prospective cohort studies

Project Summary Title and Description

Title
Low-calorie sweeteners and body weight and composition: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials and prospective cohort studies
Description
The objective of this project is to systematically review and quantitatively evaluate randomized controlled trials and prospective cohort studies, separately, that examined the relationship between low-calorie sweeteners and body weight and composition.
Attribution
N/A
Authors of Report
N/A
Methodology description
A systematic literature search identified 15 randomized controlled trials and 9 prospective cohort studies that examined low-calorie sweeteners from foods or beverages, or low-calorie sweeteners consumed as tabletop sweeteners. Meta-analyses generated weighted mean differences in body weight and composition values between the low-calorie sweetener and control groups among randomized controlled trials, and weighted mean correlations for low-calorie sweetener intake and these parameters among prospective cohort studies.
PROSPERO
N/A
DOI
10.7301/Z0V985ZK
Notes
N/A
Funding Source
Supported by funding from the North American Branch of the International Life Sciences Institute.

Key Questions

1. What is the relationship between low-calorie sweeteners and body weight and composition in randomized controlled studies?
2. What is the relationship between low-calorie sweeteners and body weight and composition in prospective observational cohort studies?

Associated Extraction Forms

Associated Studies (each link opens a new tab)

TitleAuthorsYear
The effect of aspartame as part of a multidisciplinary weight-control program on short- and long-term control of body weight.
A trial of sugar-free or sugar-sweetened beverages and body weight in children.
A randomized trial of sugar-sweetened beverages and adolescent body weight.
Effects of decreasing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption on body weight in adolescents: a randomized, controlled pilot study.
Extended use of foods modified in fat and sugar content: nutritional implications in a free-living female population.
Effects of isomalt consumption on gastrointestinal and metabolic parameters in healthy volunteers.
An evaluation of the effect of aspartame on weight loss.
Effects of aspartame in young persons during weight reduction.
Sucrose-sweetened beverages increase fat storage in the liver, muscle, and visceral fat depot: a 6-mo randomized intervention study.2012
Effects of sugar-sweetened and sugar-free cocoa on endothelial function in overweight adults.
Sucrose compared with artificial sweeteners: different effects on ad libitum food intake and body weight after 10 wk of supplementation in overweight subjects.
Long-term dietary compensation for added sugar: effects of supplementary sucrose drinks over a 4-week period.
Effects of sucrose drinks on macronutrient intake, body weight, and mood state in overweight women over 4 weeks.
Replacing caloric beverages with water or diet beverages for weight loss in adults: main results of the Choose Healthy Options Consciously Everyday (CHOICE) randomized clinical trial.
Effect of drinking soda sweetened with aspartame or high-fructose corn syrup on food intake and body weight.
Sugar-added beverages and adolescent weight change.2004
Patterns of weight change and their relation to diet in a cohort of healthy women.
Fueling the obesity epidemic? Artificially sweetened beverage use and long-term weight gain.2008
Is sugar-sweetened beverage consumption associated with increased fatness in children?-- Not Found --
Longitudinal associations between key dietary behaviors and weight gain over time: transitions through the adolescent years.2012
Diet soda intake and risk of incident metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).2009
Beverage consumption is not associated with changes in weight and body mass index among low-income preschool children in North Dakota.2004
Dietary factors in relation to weight change among men and women from two southeastern New England communities.1997
Sugar-sweetened beverages, weight gain, and incidence of type 2 diabetes in young and middle-aged women.2004

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